Water Crisis.

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You raise several important questions at the end of your prompt, and I feel that the answer we have for these questions will define what kind of future will we have. You ask how can be fight water scarcity, and what steps should we take, asking if we should use technology, law, and the difference between developed and developing nations. I feel that dividing the possible solutions is a short sighted mistake, we must address the water crisis from all angles, and with all tools at our disposal. 

But before we go out into the world trying to solve the water crisis we must take a hard look at our country. In a large scale, the existence of a city like Las Vegas, for example, is an inexcusable situation. In a smaller scale, it is unacceptable that he largest crop in the United States is grass. Yes, grass! More than corn, wheat and fruit trees combined!

We have a long ways to go with the water crisis we are in, and we better hurry up. Because once we run out, it is not going to be a pretty sight. 

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2 responses »

  1. I agree that the water crisis is an often overlooked and underrated sustainability issue. What steps and tools do you think should be taken and used in order to address them? When completely unnecessary and flagrantly resource use and consumption-idolatry is embedded in culture how do we change the way we think? Do you think it’s too late for current generations to change? I also thought it was really interesting that grass is our biggest crop seeing as no one actually needs it except to have some semblance of an aesthetically pleasing yard or sports arena…

  2. The water crisis is really overlooked and interesting. You raise a good point about a city like Las Vegas even existing. Much of the American west has struggled with water resources for a long time, because in a lot of places there simply isnt enough water to support a human population. This has lead to huge dams and other water projects to bring the water in from other places. One good example is the Colorado river, which is so exploited that very little of its water even reaches the ocean, and the ecosystem in its delta is in danger of dying out.

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